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Library services and resources to help make your course or program pleasant and productive.

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Massive Open Online Course (MOOC)

Types of MOOCs are xMOOC and cMOOC

xMOOC is linear and instructor lead that include discussion forums for participants to share ideas and learn together.

cMOOC is "chaotic" and connected where participants choose their own learning goals and type of engagement; most likely their acquired skills, knowledge, or competencies may not be packaged in a fixed format.  As a result, it presents challenges for evaluation, verification, or certification.

Copyright & MOOCs

To minimize the chance of a course receiving a "take down" notice, it is best to link to files on the web.  You are encouraged to use your own content as much as possible and limit use of third-party copyrighted content.

  • Evaluating Content
    • Does this material (image, text, video) help me in highlignting a point?
    • Do I have to use this material or can I use a substitute (open access)?
    • What amount should I use?  Can I use only part of it? 
  • Fair Use
    • If applying, it is best to use factual content than creative works; e.g. a table or graph in a study is more likely to be considered fair use than a piece of art.
    • Use of text, images, videos must be transformative subject to pedagogical purpose and character of use.

Resources:

NOTE: See Copyright tab for additional information 

Finding Materials

  • Make every attempt to use open access content for your MOOC
  • When not feasible seek permission or determine if Fair Use is applicable - see Copyright & MOOCs section
  • CourseSites has established Partneer Technology relationship to ensure you have access to current teaching tools to engage and assess students at various levels.
    • WileyPLUS makes it easy for students to access readings and assignments, receive immediate feedback and increase engagement.
    • McGraw-Hill Higher Education allows you to extract content, assignments and assessments from its learning object repositories—including eTexts, video, interactive exercises, allowing students to stay engaged.
    • NBC Learn offers access to over 10,000 current and historical news clips and documentaries, allowing you and students to embed video clips in your courses to support discussion, blogs, or other activities.

Note: Customized content from textbook publishers course cartridges  or pairing publishings courses is not easily transferable between semesters within CourseSites.

Print Materials

To minimize the chance of a course receiving a "take down" notice, it is best to link to files on the web.  You are encouraged to use your own content as much as possible and limite use of third-party copyrighted content.

  • Evaluating Content
    • Does this material (image, text, video) help me in highlignting a point?
    • Do I have to use this material or can I use a substitute (open access)?
    • What amount should I use?  Can I use only part of it? 
  • Fair Use
    • If applying, it is best to use factual content than creative works; e.g. a table or graph in a study is more likely to be considered fair use than a piece of art.
    • Use of text, images, videos must be transformative subject to pedagogical purpose and character of use.
  • Print Materials
    • Applying short quotations from books, articles that are used in lectures or slides are usually fair use.  However, use of more content will require permission.
    • Publishers are more willing to grant permission when you are the content holder.
    • If the work quoted is part of recommended material for students to purchase, publishers are more willing to grant permission.
    • It is best to check an open-access repository such PubMed Central, a society, or a university as in Pace case, Digital Commons, to see whether a particular article.

Open Access Resources:

Librarian

Medaline Philbert

914-773-3945

Images

  • Use of pictures, graphs, figures should be essential to the point of the lesson and put through critical assessment or commentary.
  • Limited quantity and use of multiple sources are encouraged.
  • It is best to use public domain and Creative Commons when an image is for a general purpose and not necessarily for a specific subject.

Open Access Resources:

Audio | Videos

  • If students have to listen to audio or view video in entirety before a lecture can be given, it is best to link to the file and return them back to the lecture than to incorporate large amount from the file.  This will reduce the chance of receiving a "take down" notice.
  • Use of documentary, educational, older, or historic films and videos is encouraged wherever possible.
  • Popular musice and music should not be used without permission.
  • It is important to use no more than is necessary to make an important point in the lecture.
  • Where feasible, intermingle students discussion with movie and sound clips, otherwise it is best not to use.

Open Access Resources:

 

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