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Zines, Pamphlets, Artists' Publications, and Chapbooks: The World of Self-Publishing & Small Press

This zine provides history, context, and resources for students and faculty seeking to learn more about alternative publications as protest, as alternative culture, as art practice, and as community resource. Zine publishing and creation is more popular t

Digitized Zine and Booklet Collections on the Open Internet

2013. Queer Zine Archive Project -- Zinesters Do It On The Photocopier. Sticker. Place: Courtesy of the Richard F. Brush Art Gallery.. https://library.artstor.org/asset/SS7730635_7730635_10942634.

Some Comments on Digitization

It's wonderful that many historical zines and related publications have been digitized and made widely available. There are a couple points to make about this, however:

(1) Not all zinesters are ok with having their zines digitized and uploaded on the Open Internet. Similarly, some zinesters are not supportive of zines being collected by authoritative institutions like libraries, colleges and universities, and museums. Each of the collections listed in this guide has its own policies and guidelines for digitizing. Most institutions or projects will remove something if the creator/zinester requests the removal.

(2) When zines are digitized, they usually lose their original formatting. Often the pages are presented using software that allows you to virtually turn pages and view and read; PDF downloads are sometimes available, as well. But the haptic, booklet format is usually compromised. This is the trade off for being able to view the publication in the digital format.

(3) Mini zines are zines made on one piece of 8.5 x 11 paper. The form of this zine is not compromised when scanned and uploaded to the Internet. Anyone can download and print. The trick is to know how to fold and cut it.  Here's an example of a mini zine:  Random Things I See on the Streets of Bushwick, Brooklyn That Kinda Make Sense? by Daniel Fishel, from the Quarantine Public Library: The only issue with this zine is having enough color ink to print it!

Topical Zines

Black Lives Matter ABC's Book Words by James Chow, art by Justin Chow. Publisher Cabrón James.

From Printed Matter website: Alphabet book in which ever letter represents one of the 318 unarmed Black people who have lost their lives to police brutality since Eric Garner in 2014. - Cabrón James

Solidarity, Politicizing, Talking Back Volume 2 by the Asian-American Feminist Collective

PDF may take a while to fully download. About the A-AFC: We engage in intersectional feminist politics grounded
within our communities, including those whose backgrounds encompass East, Southeast, and South Asian, Pacific
Islander, multi-ethnic and diasporic Asian identities. The collective seeks to foster dialogue that explores the
intersections of Asian/American identity with issues of social justice in order to build towards collective liberation. They
continue to interrogate and define the Asian American feminist movement through media-making, event curation,
and digital storytelling.

All We Have is Each Other: a Guide to Making Fabric Masks "pieced together by YESSI (THEY/THEM) and N (THEY/THEM). Download and print double sided, flipping on short edge, to obtain a print zine. (Last few pages should be printed single-sided only since they are not part of the zine but are templates for making masks.)

Asian-American Feminist Antibodies {care in the time of coronavirus} by Asian American Feminist Collective and Bluestockings bookstore

PDF may take a while to download. From p. 3: With the COVID-19 pandemic neither behind us or solely ahead of us, this zine
offers a way to make meaning of the coronavirus crisis through long-standing practices of care that come out of Asian American histories and politics. We bring together first-hand accounts and analyses from our communities, including health and service workers and caregivers on the frontlines, students, people living with chronic illness, journalists, and organizers. Together, this collection of stories, essays, and artwork shows how we experience, resist, and grapple with a viral outbreak that has been racialized as Asian, is spoken of in the language of contagion and invasion, and reveals the places where our collective social safety net is particularly threadbare.

Born Digital DIY (not just zines)