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Virtual Book Displays

This guide highlights books from the library's collection on different timely themes.

Black History Month

Autobiography of Malcolm X

The Autobiography of Malcolm X

Malcolm Little, better known as Malcolm X, was an African American human rights activist who was a popular figure during the civil rights movement. For several years he was a vocal spokesman for the Nation of Islam. This autobiography tells the extraordinary story of how he educated himself in prison and eventually gained fame as a courageous civil rights leader and powerful orator.

The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr

The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr

Martin Luther King, Jr. was the principal leader of the U.S. civil rights movement and one of the twentieth century's most influential men. Now, in a special volume commissioned and authorized by his family, here is the life and times of Martin Luther King, Jr., drawn from a comprehensive collection of writings, recordings, and documentary materials, many of which have never before been made public.

Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes was one of the great African American literary figures to come out of the Harlem Renaissance. This book is a collection of twelve critical essays on Hughes and his work, arranged in chronological order of their original publication. The play "A Raisin in the Sun, " by Lorraine Hansberry, took it's title from the poem "Harlem" (also known as "A Dream Deferred") by Langston Hughes. 

 

Frederick Douglass

Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American slave.

Written in 1845, the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is a memoir written by the former slave who became one of the most famous abolitionists and orators in American history. 

Harlem Renaissance

Harlem Renaissance (EBOOK)

The Harlem Renaissance was an intellectual, social, and artistic explosion among African American writers centered in Harlem, Manhattan, New York City, spanning the 1920s.

Beloved

Beloved

Toni Morrison won a Pulitzer Prize for Beloved, published in 1987. The novel is about an escaped female American slave who is captured then kills her child rather than have her taken back into slavery. Morrison was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993.

The Complete Encyclopedia of African American History

The Complete Encyclopedia of African American History

This encyclopedic work aims to increase the wealth of information that is currently published on African Americans and their struggle for civil rights. It builds on such works, by bringing together in one convenient volume topics and issues that may appear in many different works.

This Is Our Music: Free Jazz, the Sixties, and American Culture

This Is Our Music: Free Jazz, the Sixties, and American Culture

The author exams and concludes that attempts by African American artists and intellectuals to define a place for themselves in American life, structural changes in the music industry, and the rise of nonprofit sponsorship portended a significant transformation of established cultural standards.

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

Maya Angelou's first memoir is a modern American classic beloved worldwide. The kindness of others, Maya's own strong spirit, and the ideas of great authors ("I met and fell in love with William Shakespeare") will allow her to be free instead of imprisoned.

Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

In this lyrical, unsentimental, and compelling memoir, the son of a black African father and a white American mother searches for a workable meaning to his life as a black American. He travelled from a small town in Kansas, where he retraces the migration of his mother's family to Hawaii, and then to Kenya, where he meets the African side of his family, confronts the bitter truth of his father's life, and at last reconciles his divided inheritance.

African Americans in Sports

African Americans in Sports

It covers African-Americans in sports, on events, tournaments, leagues, clubs, films, and associations. The entries cover all professional, amateur, and college sports such as baseball, tennis, and golf.

The Help

This is a 2011 movie. In 1960s Mississippi, Skeeter, a southern society girl, returns from college determined to become a writer but turns her friends' lives and a small Mississippi town upside down when she decides to interview the black women who have spent their lives taking care of prominent southern families. 

The Warmth of Other Suns : the Epic Story of America's Great Migration

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America

W.E.B. Du Bois : An American Intellectual and Activist

W.E.B. Du Bois : An American Intellectual and Activist

W. E. B. Du Bois was one of the most prolific African American authors, scholars, and leaders of the twentieth century, the boos introduced the man and his impact on American history, exploring his racial strategy, civil rights activity, journalistic career, and his role as an international spokesman.

I Have A Dream

I Have A Dream

The book presents illustrations and the text of the speech given by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on August 28, 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial, in which he described his visionary dream of equality and brotherhood for humankind
 

Have Black Lives Ever Mattered?

Have Black Lives Ever Mattered?

This collection of short meditations, written from a prison cell, captures the past two decades of police violence that gave rise to Black Lives Matter while digging deeply into the history of the United States. The author gives voice to the many people of color who have fallen to police bullets or racist abuse, and offers the post-Ferguson generation advice on how to address police abuse in the United States.

George Washington Carver : An Innovative Life

George Washington Carver : An Innovative Life

The Juvenile book chronicles Carver's life from childhood to the end of his career, that he was a scientist, painter, inventor, singer, and champion of equal rights.

Gateway to Freedom : The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad

Building on fresh evidence―including a detailed record of slave escapes secretly kept by Sydney Howard Gay, one of the key organizers in New York―the author Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner elevates the underground railroad from folklore to sweeping history. The story is inspiring―full of memorable characters making their first appearance on the historical stage―and significant―the controversy over fugitive slaves inflamed the sectional crisis of the 1850s. It eventually took a civil war to destroy American slavery, but here at last is the story of the courageous effort to fight slavery by "practical abolition," person by person, family by family.

Harriet, the Moses of Her People

Harriet, the Moses of Her People

Harriet Tubman is one of the most famous women in American history, and from an early age every American learns of her contributions to abolition and the Underground Railroad. The woman who became known as the Moses of her people personally led more than 13 expeditions to free slaves in the South, and she was so integral in helping escaped slaves achieve freedom that her name is practically synonymous with the Underground Railroad today.

Amistad : A Long Road to Freedom

Amistad : A Long Road to Freedom

Traces the 1839 revolt of Africans against their Spanish captors aboard the slave ship Amistad, their landing in the United States and arrest for piracy and murder, and trials which ended in their acquittal by the Supreme Court

Lincoln's Birthday

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln

Marking the two-hundredth anniversary of Lincoln's birth, this marvelous short biography by a leading historian offers an illuminating portrait of one of the giants in the American story.

Lincoln's Sword

This is a brilliant and unprecedented examination of how Lincoln used the power of words to not only build his political career but to keep the country united during the Civil War.

Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln

Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln

In this dual biography of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln, Harvard University scholar John Stauffer describes the transformations in the lives of these two giants during a major shift in cultural history, when men rejected the status quo and embraced new ideals of personal liberty. As Douglass and Lincoln reinvented themselves and ultimately became friends, they transformed America.

Last Best Hope of the Earth

Last Best Hope of the Earth

This is an excellent short biography of Abraham Lincoln, with emphasis on his years as president. Writing in the Washington Post Book World, historian Stephen W. Sears said this book "is a wonderfully clear, wonderfully concise, wonderfully satisfying look at what Lincoln meant to the Civil War generation, and what he should mean to us.”
 

Lincoln

Lincoln

In one of the seminal biographies of our sixteenth president, "Donald goes beyond biography, illuminating the gradual development of Lincoln’s character, chronicling his tremendous capacity for evolution and growth, thus illustrating what made it possible for a man so inexperienced and so unprepared for the presidency to become a great moral leader."

Team of Rivals

Team of Rivals

When screen writer Tony Kushner and Steven Spielberg were working on the film Lincoln, they consulted extensively with historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. Team of Rivals is about Lincoln's relationship with his cabinet and showcases his remarkable political skills. Actor Daniel Day-Lewis won an Academy Award for Best Actor for his portrayal as Lincoln in the 2012 film directed by Spielberg. 

Abraham Lincoln and the Second American Revolution

Abraham Lincoln and the Second American Revolution

Topics in this collection of essays include Lincoln's role as Commander-in-Chief of the Union forces, the Civil War as a Second American Revolution, and the sixteenth president's rhetorical skills, powerfully demonstrated in the essay entitled "How Lincoln Won the War with Metaphors." 

Lincoln DVD

Lincoln DVD

Actor Daniel Day-Lewis won an Academy Award for his portrayal of Lincoln in this 2012 film directed by Steven Spielberg. The film is based in part on the book "Team of Rivals: the Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln" by Doris Kearns Goodwin.

Lincoln the Inventor

Lincoln the Inventor (EBOOK)

President Lincoln was a polymath. In addition to being a successful lawyer, a great politician, and a brilliant writer, he was also very skilled technically. He is the only president who holds a patent. Lincoln's patent, No. 6,469, was granted on May 22, 1849, for a device for "Buoying Vessels Over Shoals," according to Smithsonian Magazine, October 2006. This EBOOK explains how Lincoln's "penchant for inventions and inventiveness was part of his larger political belief in internal improvements and free labor principles."